Quick Assembly Instructions for AL, MM series rotors.

When your blades arrive you should have enclosed in your box the following:

1 blade for each arm on the hub (IE 3, 4, 5, or 10).

2 each, bolts, 4 flat washers, and 2 lock nuts for each blade. (IE 6, 8, 10, or 20 each)

1 hub to mount the blade on.

 You will need two 7/16 wrenches, or one wrench and one nut driver for assembly of the small AL Series blades.  

  • First prime and paint your hub any color you desire.  After the hub is dry you are ready to assemble your rotor.

        Hold a blade in your right hand with the mounting holes on the left side bottom.  The curve of the blade will follow the curve of your fingers in your right hand.
Flip the hub until the bolt holes on the top arm of the hub are on the left side. The TLG logo will be facing you. 

        The blade will sit on the front side of the hub.  Make sure the straight part of the blade is running flush down the hub.  The holes should line up and leave over half of the hub arm behind the blade for support.  
You should NOT be able to see any of the hub arm behind the blade if you have it on correctly.  See pictures below.

        On the AL & MM series place a flat washer on a bolt, and press it through the hole in the front/face side of the blade. 

        Press the bolt that is now out the backside of the blade through the matching hole in the hub.

        Place a washer on the bolt (it should be against the steel hub) then put a nut on. 

See figure A1 and A2 below for examples.

 Continue with this process until all the hardware is installed.

 DO NOT over tighten and smash the Aluminum on the AL & MM series.  Nice and snug is all that is required.  I use a 7/16" nut driver to tighten mine.

The AL , MM Series.

The entire TLG rotor line is made of Aluminum blades. 
You can polish and wax them,  If you want the polished look make them as shinny as you want, then clear coat them with a nice coat of clear paint.  The blades are made of a high grade aluminum and it takes a long time (many years) before they will even start to tarnish, but if you clear coat them they will stay looking new for a long time.

If you want to be creative with your blades feel free to paint them up any way you want to.  By the way I would love to see some really cool paint jobs.

We suggest you at least clear coat the blades to keep them from oxidizing.  Oxidizing is that gray yucky dead look that Aluminum can get when it is not protected from the elements.  However the AL series of blades have been out for more than 3 years and most people are saying they still look new, but oxidation will happen sometime along the way if they are left bare.
They're too pretty to let them get that way.

 

Balancing the Prop
Not required on the AL or MM series.

Bench top

Place the prop upside-down on a smooth round object that will not go through the ” inch hole; but still allows the hub to rest on the ” hole (not on the blades).  A pinball setting on a piece of pipe works well.

If the blades pull down on one side or the other add a larger ” flat washer to the side that rose up.  Continue with this process until the blades do not try to slide off the object they are resting on.  A slight tilt will not have that much effect on blades.

 

Balancing the Prop
Not required on the AL or MM series.

On a smooth turning ” shaft

Bolt the hub onto your shaft.

Slowly turn the blades and allow them to fall to the heavy side.  (Example; if you push the blade slightly CW and it moves back CCW on its own, the blade that is heavy is on the bottom.

Add weight to the top arm of the hub and then turn the blade of a turn and see if it is balanced or if it still needs more weight.  If it sits still it is balanced.

NOTE: you must try the blade with each of the blades starting at 10 or 2 (O-clock).  If they sit still in each position the blade is balanced.

 

NOTE:   For the sake of safety, please use an arbor that the blades will rotate in the direction to tighten the arbor nut.    Meaning if your turbine is an upwind and your blades turn CW the nut should also tighten CW as well.  A CW blade on a downwind machine would need CCW threads on the arbor.  This will keep the wind from unscrewing your arbor nut and the rotor  from flying off.

 

Below is a 3-blade clockwise rotation on an “upwind” unit.
You are looking at the front of the blades as the wind would hit them.


 If your blades are not assembled like in the pictures below DO NOT fly them.

A1

 
Notice how the straight side of the blade runs "FLUSH" with the side of the hub.
This is correctly assembled.

CLOCKWISE ROTATION

Note that the curve of the blade rises to meet the oncoming wind.

The wind hitting the blades will make this unit turn in a clockwise rotation.  




<--- Optical Illusion 
That blade is NOT flipped over.

 

Below is a 4-blade clockwise rotation on an “upwind” unit.
You are looking at the front of the blades as the wind would hit them.

A2

 
Notice how the straight side of the blade runs "FLUSH" with the side of the hub.
This is correctly assembled.

CLOCKWISE ROTATION

Note that the curve of the blade rises to meet the oncoming wind.

The wind hitting the blades will make this unit turn in a clockwise rotation.

 

 

<--- Optical Illusion 
That blade is NOT flipped over.

CAUTION!

Please use extreme care when mounting your blades to your generator.  The blades have sharp edges and if you are not careful you may be injured.  Do not have any part of your body near these blades once they are released and allowed to rotate from the unpredictable force of the wind.  The tips of the blades can go from 0 to well over 100 mph in as little as 1 second.  It would not be a pretty sight to come in contact with a moving blade. 

 If you have any questions you can contact me at: 

Phone: (620) 422-3700
OR

Thank you!

Back to the Instructions

Back to the blades.

 

 

 

 

bob@tlgwindpower.com